キング・イン・ザ・ミラー (Japanese Edition)

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Click here to see more deals. See more Watches. We calculate the import fee deposit at checkout and provide customs clearance on your behalf. AmazonGlobal eligible items ship to the following destinations:. Browse International Products on Amazon: Select the AmazonGlobal Eligible box on the left side of category page or search result page to see items that will ship to AmazonGlobal eligible destinations! Since the book teaches fluency-maximizing techniques rather than specific grammar points, it can be read with advantage by both beginner and advanced students.

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It teaches new strategies for thinking, speaking and memorizing Japanese quickly, efficiently and independently. Although many different areas of the language are covered, the strategies or "secrets" have all been selected for one and the same reason. They work. Every single secret guarantees a sudden and dramatic improvement in students' powers of expression. Quantity, however, is not everything. There is no merit in students knowing masses of vocabulary if they cannot use it.

Ultimately the ability to manipulate knowledge is more important than the ability to accumulate it. This book therefore teaches students how to preset their "mind-filters" so they can remember more words and expressions, and then go on to combine them more freely to extract maximum mileage from whatever they know Barron's , New York. In both you'll find each idiom defined and followed by an illustrative sentence in both languages.

The Japanese text is written in both Japanese characters and Romaji. Roland A. Barron's Educational Series, Inc.

He must not only study such material to learn new words and grammatical constructions, but also practice what he has already learned in drill sessions with native speakers of the language. There are a number of textbooks designed to give that sort of well rounded introduction to Japanese. One which has especially complete notes on grammar and usage is Eleanor Jorden's Beginning Japanese.

This handbook of Japanese verbs is not designed to provide the student with a complete course in Japanese. Rather it is a reference work which gives a concise, easy-to-understand description of Japanese verbal inflection and derivation together with tables showing all the necessary forms of of the most important and widely used Japanese verbs. Since there is currently no other text which specializes in the Japanese verb, Japanese Verbs should be of help to both beginning and advanced students. For the beginner it constitutes a valuable aid in learning basic inflection of the verb.

Most textbooks only provide the student with a few examples to illustrate the principles of inflection. This means that the student is hampered in writing compositions or drilling with other students because he has no way in which to check a given form of an unfamiliar verb to see if he is correct. With Japanese Verbs the student will be able to quickly verify the form he is interested in.

By presenting the full array of verbal inflection and derivation in tables this book also enables the beginning student to see the language as a system rather than as a haphazard collection of stems and endings. The more advanced student will profit from this systematic view of the language too, because it will help him to organize the many inflected forms which he has learned into a systematic body of data. Such formalization of knowledge is especially necessary for anyone who plans to teach the language some day.

They must not only study such material to learn new words and grammatical constructions, but also practice what they have already learned in drill sessions with native speakers of the language. There are a number of textbooks designed to give that sort of well-rounded introduction to Japanese. One which explains grammar and usage particularly well is Eleanor H. Jorden's Beginning Japanese.


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This handbook of Japanese verbs is not designed to provide students with a complete course in Japanese. Rather, it is a reference work which gives a concise, easy-to-understand description of Japanese verbal inflection and derivation, together with tables showing all the necessary forms of important and widely used Japanese verbs. For beginners, it constitutes a valuable aid in learning basic verbal inflection.

Most textbooks only provide students with a few examples to illustrate the principles of inflection. This means that students are hampered because there is no way to check a given form of an unfamiliar verb. With Japanese Verbs students will be able to quickly verify the form in which they are interested.

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By presenting the full array of verbal inflection and derivation in tables, this book also enables beginning students to see the language as a system, rather than as a haphazard collection of stems and endings The Hokuseido Press , Tokyo. Yoshiko Higurashi. Harcourt Brace Japan Inc. Like Current Japanese , the motivation and purpose of this text can be summarized as follows: What are the major obstacles faced by college students of foreign languages? I have been teaching Japanese at the college level in North America for fourteen years. Judging from my experience at five universities, the issue is intercultural communication with practical language skills; namely, recognizing and dealing with intercultural differences while learning to use the language as an effective means of communication.

Regardless of the distinction between state and private institutions, students at intermediate and advanced levels who have finished basic training in grammar, pronunciation, and basic kanji, can be categorized into the following groups: 1. Those who are familiar with modern Japanese society but cannot discuss it in Japanese.

Those who have misconceptions about Japan. These misconceptions could be good or bad in terms of images of Japan, but are certainly outdated. Some of these students can communicate in Japanese, others cannot Ronald Suleski , Hiroko Masada. All languages have affective expressions which help to enrich communication by implying subtle differences, such as varying degrees of annoyance or resignation, skepticism or humor. Native speakers of a language use these expressions all the time to flavor their speech. They are usually quick to realize the implication of the affective expression, and they often act on it rather than on the direct meaning of the sentence.

A large number of affective expressions are not slang terms, but are standard words used by every native speaker. Native speakers of English use words such as "I really can't help you now," or "that was a stupid thing to do," as value-laden terms which fall into the category of affective expressions because of the strong nuances they imply. Anne Matsumoto Stewart. The serious student, studying in school where hiragana and kanji maintain pride of place, is often left with a less than perfect introduction to the katakana syllabary.

The casual learner the tourist, business person, etc.

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It is for these two divergent types of reader that the present book was written. One of the primary functions of katakana is for marking native Japanese words for emphasis, much as italics is used in English. It is such words as this, of which there are a considerable number, that the casual learner will eventually be able to pick up after going through this book. Once the means of transcription has been learned - that is, katakana - the meanings of the words themselves can often Naoko Chino.

Take, for instance, Japanese nouns, verbs, adjectives, and adverbs. Once you have a little grammar under your belt, you can pick them up and squirrel them away with relative ease. For some reason, though, this doesn't work with particles. They can't be looked up, pinned down, or pigeonholed in the same way that their fellows can. Yet their correct usage is essential to speaking Japanese with any degree of fluency. Why are particles so elusive? Because particles are next to meaningless as isolated entities. A particle, in fact, might be defined as a non-conjugating part of speech, bearing an absolute minimum of independent meaning, which attaches itself to other parts of speech and thereby places them in context.

Thus, a statement consisting of a single particle wouldn't convey much meaning. But the addition of another word would make a world of difference. The rule of thumb might be: Japanese particles have virtually no meaning bereft of context. In this book, I propose to clarify the functions of a considerable number of particles, to describe their various usages, and, most important, to exemplify each and every usage with sample sentences. Only in this way - through context - can the student truly come to grips with the Japanese particle. Don't be surprised by certain of the particles taken up here.

For example, there is -ba , as in nomeba if [you] drink. You may think that -ba is not a particle at all, but an inflection of the verb nomu You may even have egged on a rowdy drinking buddy by telling him that the fast-approaching pound bouncer everyone called "Hulk" was really just a big of "pussycat. Japanese has accumulated a linguistic menagerie over the ages that is as wide-ranging as the sea, land, and sky that nurtures the national consciousness and has given generations of Japanese wags food for thought as well as the palate.

Surprisingly, some idioms are precisely the same as their English equivalent: karasu no ashiato for those pesky "crows feet" around the corners of your aging eyes, mizu o hanareta sakana to describe someone who is out of his element or "like a fish out of water.

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Ushi no yodare cow saliva , for example, is used of something that drags on interminably, while kingyo no fun goldfish poop is a graphic depiction of someone you want badly to shake but who just keeps hanging on The Japan Times , Tokyo. Kuroshio Shuppan , Tokyo. Kakuko Shoji. During my thirty-year teaching career, I have seen a great variety of mistakes, many of which were the result of cultural differences or differences in the way that second-language learners and native speakers of Japanese conceptualize language. The book attempts to help students become aware of these differences in conceptualization and to provide them with the linguistic tools to overcome these differences, thereby allowing their ideas to flow more naturally.

The book focuses on those grammatical items, idiomatic expressions, and set phrases that have proven to be the most problematic to my students.

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